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Dog Health 101 - BUFO FROG

Bufo Toads
A real threat to South Florida dogs

Background
Bufo toads are a threat to Florida dogs. They generally come out at night, and are especially prevalent in wet weather. Bufo's produce toxins from the parotid glands (located behind the head) that affect two major organ systems: the cardiovascular (heart/blood vessels) and the nervous system (brain).

Signs of Toxicity
Common signs of intoxication include foaming from the mouth, drooling, pawing at the mouth, vomiting, stumbling, falling, tremors, rigid legs and seizures.

Treatment
If you suspect your dog has been in contact with a toad, place a hose along the inside of the dogs mouth, point the dog's head downward to make sure it won't be swallowed and flush his/her mouth completely while rubbing the gums until they no longer feel slimy. Rinse the mouth for 3 to 5 minutes at a time for a total of 3 times. Make sure not to force water down your dog's mouth to try to make your dog swallow. You do not want the poison to be ingested. An even better solution would be to use a wet wash cloth and wipe the inside of the mouth and gums. If you still feel that your dog has been poisoned, get prompt veterinary attention!



1807 S. Powerline Road Suite B-109, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 - 954-422-5764 Fax 954-794-0299
 

Dog Health 101 - BUFO FROG

Bufo Toads
A real threat to South Florida dogs

Background


Bufo toads are a threat to Florida dogs. They generally come out at night, and are especially prevalent in wet weather. Bufo's produce toxins from the parotid glands (located behind the head) that affect two major organ systems: the cardiovascular (heart/blood vessels) and the nervous system (brain).

Signs of Toxicity
Common signs of intoxication include foaming from the mouth, drooling, pawing at the mouth, vomiting, stumbling, falling, tremors, rigid legs and seizures.

Treatment
If you suspect your dog has been in contact with a toad, place a hose along the inside of the dogs mouth, point the dog's head downward to make sure it won't be swallowed and flush his/her mouth completely while rubbing the gums until they no longer feel slimy. Rinse the mouth for 3 to 5 minutes at a time for a total of 3 times. Make sure not to force water down your dog's mouth to try to make your dog swallow. You do not want the poison to be ingested. An even better solution would be to use a wet wash cloth and wipe the inside of the mouth and gums. If you still feel that your dog has been poisoned, get prompt veterinary attention!